Pakistan needs more Internists and we need to practice integrated care

KARACHI: In order to provide standardized healthcare to our population we need to have more internists and practice integrated medicine. Pakistan Society of Internal Medicine deserve to be commended to have successfully revived and reintroduced the specialty of Internal Medicine. This was stated by Prof. Ejaz Ahmad Vohra an eminent physician, former Principal of Karachi Medical & Dental College who is currently Dean Clinical at Zia Uddin Medical University, Karachi. He was speaking at the 3rd Annual Conference of PSIM held at Karachi from May 6th to May 8th 2022 where he was invited to be the Chief Guest at the inaugural session. He is also Patron of PSIM.

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“Diabetes and Pregnancy”

In a country like Pakistan where self-projection, solo flight is preferred and is a norm, team work is almost non-existent, compiling, editing and publishing and multi author book is no less than a miracle. This has been accomplished by Prof. Ahmed Bilal Prof. and Head of the Dept. Of Medicine at Faisalabad Medical University and his colleagues. The result is a 440-page colorful book containing sixty-one chapters on “Diabetes and Pregnancy: A Journey into the Past, Present and Future of Care”. 

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Speakers pay rich tributes to late Prof. S.A.R. Gardezi

LAHORE: King Edward Medical University organized a condolence meeting for late Prof. S.A.R. Gardezi an eminent surgeon of Pakistan on May 10th 2022 at the KEMU Campus which was largely attended by eminent medical personalities from all the medical institutions of Lahore including Vice Chancellors, Principals, Deans and senior faculty members. Prof. Kh. Saadiq Hussain and Prof. Mahmood Ali Malik two senior most physicians of the country and former Principals of King Edward Medical College besides son of Prof. Gardezi, Prof. Javed Gardezi were also present on this occasion.

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History of pandemics & lessons to be learnt from Covid-19

In the later part of the nineteenth century (around 1860) medical science witnessed significant developments on cellular and microbiological levels. Isolation of pathogens, development of vaccines and their administration on a mass scale, development of infrastructure, improvement in sanitary conditions, and availability of antibiotics over the course of centuries brought many deadly outbreaks of dreadful infectious diseases under control.

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Addressing organ shortages with 3D printed tissue scaffolds

Addressing the gaps of organ shortages with a novel platform for the personalization of xenogeneic and 3D printed tissue scaffolds – an enormous opportunity for commercialization of advanced therapies. An initiative funded by the Swedish government is now bringing together industry leaders like RISE, CELLINK, VERIGRAFT, Sahlgrenska University Hospital and the University of Gothenburg.

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A dynamic left-hand squeeze helps to optimize performance

The images are legendary: Tennis stars who hit the deciding match ball just outside the line, golfers who putt the ball past the cup from only inches away, and speakers who suddenly can’t say a word. These individuals all have one thing in common: They are unable to access their performance abilities in a crucial situation. A research team at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) investigated the phenomenon and has come up with a solution.

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Discharging ear still a health dilemma in Pakistan and developing countries

Ear discharge due to chronic supportive otitis media (CSOM) is one of the very common health problem in Pakistan and under developed countries mostly with dense population. CSOM is a major cause of acquired hearing impairment in children especially in developing countries. This potentially life threatening issue require sincere efforts to avert the serious consequences. In Pakistan, India, south east Asian countries, and many countries of African continent, it is one of the most common childhood illness. This is well known for recurrence, and some time persistence despite of treatment.

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WHO reports Acute Severe Hepatitis of unknown origin in Children?

GENEVA: World Health Organization has reported outbreak of Acute Severe Hepatitis of unknown origin in Children in many countries. As of 21 April 2022, at least 169 cases of acute hepatitis of unknown origin have been reported from 11 countries in the WHO European Region and one country in the WHO Region of the Americas (Figure 1). Cases have been reported in the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland (the United Kingdom) (114), Spain (13), Israel (12), the United States of America (9), Denmark (6), Ireland (<5), The Netherlands (4), Italy (4), Norway (2), France (2), Romania (1), and Belgium (1).

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Detection of recurrent breast cancer and monitoring its progression

Liquid biopsy performed on serum samples taken from breast cancer patients can provide increasingly accurate information on cancer progression and enable earlier detection of cancer recurrence, a new study from the University of Eastern Finland and Kuopio University Hospital shows. The findings were published in Cancers.

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Good Infection Prevention Control programmes can reduce health care infections by 70%

GENEVA: The COVID-19 pandemic and other recent large disease outbreaks have highlighted the extent to which health care settings can contribute to the spread of infections, harming patients, health workers and visitors, if insufficient attention is paid to infection prevention and control (IPC). But a new report from the World Health Organization (WHO) shows that where good hand hygiene and other cost-effective practices are followed, 70% of those infections can be prevented. 

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