Centralized admission policy for private medical and dental colleges will not work smoothly

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 Many seats might remain vacant?

Centralized admission policy for
private medical and dental colleges
will not work smoothly

Sole reliance on academic grades for
eligibility for admission is its greatest drawback

LAHORE: Centralized admission policy for private medical and dental colleges introduced in the country in addition to public sector institutions may not work smoothly and it is feared that failure to fulfill all the conditions laid down for admission may result in many seats remaining vacant. Sole reliance on academic grades for eligibility for admission is the greatest drawback of this policy which is bound to fail unless some measures are taken in consultation with all the stake holders including parents, owners of private medical and dental colleges as well as private medical universities.

Attitude, aptitude of the students, empathy, tolerance, devotion and dedication to serve the ailing humanity are some of the important yardsticks apart from academic grades on which the students need to be tested before admission. In many countries overseas, those students who wish to get admission to medical schools have to spend a few days to weeks in hospitals to acquaint themselves with the environment in which they will have to work before making up their mind to finally get admission. During these few days many students change their mind and opt for other professions. These were some of the issues which used to serve as the guiding principles during the admission test conducted by the management of private medical and dental colleges after the entry test and announcement of the merit list. Even in the past, many students who got admission in medical colleges in public sector colleges later did not find the professional career attractive, hence even after qualifying as doctors, they preferred to join Civil Service, Police Service, Customs, Pharmaceutical Trade and Industry and some even went into business, did not practice thus wasting precious government resources spent on training a doctor besides wasting a seat which could have been used by some other deserving candidates.

After the entry test and announcement of merit list, the authorities should leave it to the private medical and dental colleges to conduct test and admit the students they wish to enroll. The whole admission process can be monitored to ensure that no additional donations are demanded for admission, only the fees fixed is charged but there is no justification to force students to get admission in a particular medical and dental college or force the owners of these institutions to admit students without their own input and being part of the selection process. Some institutions may not be interested to enroll, admit students much lower on the merit list because it will mean they will have to work much harder teaching and training them.

It all started with the complaints of demand of huge donations for admission by the owners of some of these private medical and dental colleges which should have been investigated but the courts went too far. Institutions like University of Health Sciences (UHS) and National University of Medical Sciences (NUMS) won’t be able to help smooth functioning of this system but it will also adversely affect their own performance since lot of human resources will be involved in this admission process which will neglect their own professional responsibilities. In fact one can already feel is impact. Some of the students shifted to other institutions on the merit list after being upgraded might decide to stay on thus creating further problems of adjustment for those undertaking this admission process. The authorities are well advised to wake up to the ground realities before it is too late, call a meeting of all the stake holders and resolve these issues instead of fighting court battles. Let us hope better sense prevails on all those concerned and the Nation is saved from making yet another experiment whose success is highly questionable.

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